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        Pea Enation Virus

        Pea Enation Mosaic Virus (PEMV)

        Pea enation virus
        Pea enation virus [Credit: T.A. Zitter, Cornell University]
        Pea enation virus [Credit: T.A. Zitter, Cornell University]
        Pea enation virus
        Pea enation virus [Credit: Melodie Putnam, Oregon State University]
        Pea enation virus [Credit: Melodie Putnam, Oregon State University]
        Pea enation virus
        Pea enation virus [Credit: Melodie Putnam, Oregon State University]
        Pea enation virus [Credit: Melodie Putnam, Oregon State University]
        Pea enation virus
        Pea enation virus [Credit: Melodie Putnam, Oregon State University]
        Pea enation virus [Credit: Melodie Putnam, Oregon State University]
        Pea enation virus
        Pea enation virus [Credit: Melodie Putnam, Oregon State University]
        Pea enation virus [Credit: Melodie Putnam, Oregon State University]


        Host Plants:

        On Crops: Peas, fava beans, soybeans; aphids transmit the disease as they feed

        Where Found:

        Worldwide, wherever peas are grown

        Description:

        Leaves develop small yellowish spots that gradually turn white, creating a windowpane appearance. The leaf texture becomes crinkled, with small cracks and blisters evident on leaf undersides. New growth is twisted with small leaves, and stems may turn sideways. Any pods produced are twisted and small.

        Damage:

        Like other viruses, pea enation mosaic virus interferes with genetic signaling within the plant. Leaves that are distorted by the virus cannot function normally, so plants stop gaining size and may produce odd clusters of infertile flowers.

        Preventing Problems:

        Do not save seeds from plants that show symptoms of viral infection, because the virus can be carried within the seed. Many pea varieties are resistant to pea enation mosaic virus; resistant varieties may show slight symptoms, and then outgrow the problem. Measures that reduce aphid populations will cut the risk of this and other viral diseases in the garden. Grow plenty of nectar-producing flowers to attract aphid predators including ladybeetles, lacewings and hover flies.

        Managing Outbreaks:

        Infected plants may make a slight recovery, but they will not be good producers. To keep the problem from spreading, pull up infected plants and compost them. Dispose of any unused seeds, because it is possible the seeds were infected with the virus.

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